The Pentecostal Experience of William Booth-Clibborn


In 1921, William Edmond Booth-Clibborn preached a successful tent revival in Lodi, California. Inspired by the results, Bro. Booth-Clibborn suggested that the revival party continue meetings further south and set up a tent in Holtville. After acquiring the necessary permits and lighting, they began services. Sadly, heavy rains and low attendance literally quenched the fiery services. Unable to pay the light bill for the week of disappointing meetings, Booth-Clibborn and his comrades took temporary jobs as field hands, harvesting corn. The evangelist, unused to such labor and forlorn by his failure, did little work. Finally, he sat down, crestfallen and dejected.

In this moment of self-pity, the Lord began to deal with him. As heavent-sent words began to flow in his spirit, Bro. Booth-Clibborn began to sing the words to one of the greatest anthems of the Apostolic Church:

Down from His glory,

Ever living story,

My God and Savior came,

And Jesus was His name.

Born in a manger,

To His own a stranger,

A Man of sorrows, tears and agony.

O how I love Him! How I adore Him!

My breath, my sunshine, my all in all!

The great Creator became my Savior,

And all God’s fulness dwelleth in Him.

What condescension,

Bringing us redemption;

That in the dead of night,

Not one faint hope in sight,

God, gracious, tender,

Laid aside His splendor,

Stooping to woo, to win, to save my soul.

Without reluctance,

Flesh and blood His substance

He took the form of man,

Revealed the hidden plan.

O glorious myst’ry,

Sacrifice of Calv’ry,

And now I know Thou art the great “I AM.”

This beloved song, which so gloriously articulates the revelation of the Mighty God in Christ, has inspired generations of Oneness Pentecostals and was perhaps Bro. Booth-Clibborn’s most enduring contribution to the movement.

William Booth-Clibborn was the grandson of General William Booth, British founder of the Salvation Army. Booth-Clibborn’s mother, Catherine, was a dynamic Salvation Army preacher and commanded the group’s work in France, Holland, and Belgium. William, named for her father, was born in France.

When William was a boy, his mother and father, Arthur, resigned their positions with the Salvation Army to pursue a more radical path. In 1902, the family joined Zion, Illinois, the utopian community led by John Alexander Dowie, a famous healing evangelist. Arthur was greatly influenced by Dowie’s message and began preaching holiness and healing on his return to England. Catherine also distinguished herself as an international evangelist and traveled extensively preaching amongst various evangelical groups.

In 1908, Arthur Booth-Clibborn learned of a burgeoning group of Pentecostals holding meetings in the Plumstead District of London. He persuaded his youngest son, William, to join him on the trip to London. On the train ride, Arthur asked his 15-year-old son, “William, don’t you think you ought to yield your heart to God afresh?” The question pricked his young heart. He had lost the zeal of his repentance experience at boarding school, and he approached the meeting in a small London mission hall with a renewed hunger for the Lord!

The service was led by a Mrs. Cantell, and the young William was transfixed by the passionate singing and speaking in tongues. Arthur Booth-Clibborn spoke eight languages, and William spoke five. The “strange language” was not recognizable to either, but Mr. Booth-Clibborn assured his son that “This is the unknown tongue you read about in Scripture.”

Mr. Alexander Moncur Niblock, a Baptist convert who had just received the Holy Ghost a few days before, was the speaker at the Booth-Clibborn’s first service. At the altar invitation, William made a strong repentance, praying from 10 PM ‘til 1 AM. He experienced a return of his zeal and desire for the Lord.

On Sunday, William and his father attended more Spirit-filled meetings at the Plumstead home of Mr. Bristow. At the evening service, William became insatiably hungry for the baptism of the Holy Spirit. At the altar, he was enraptured by the presence of God, praying fervently, hungrily for the Holy Ghost:

I found myself singing in a beautiful language entirely foreign to me. Its charm and surprising sounds saturated me with an indescribable ecstasy. Every sweet sentence fully & adequately expressed the pent-up feelings of my inflamed heart . . . Direct from the altar of my heart, rising in surging burning billows, the most pleasing incense was reaching the Throne!

So began the experience of faith that led William Booth-Clibborn into an anointed ministry. He was later baptized in Jesus’ Name and proclaimed the great truth of the Oneness of God, joining the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World. Disillusioned with some of the later fragmentation of the Pentecostal movement, Booth-Clibborn eventually became less organizationally exclusive but maintained his Oneness stand, developing a remarkable Pentecostal ministry throughout his life. He founded several churches and led Immanuel Temple in Portland, Oregon until his death in 1969 at the age of seventy-six.

*Special thanks to Pat Clibborn, daughter-in-law of W.E. Clibborn, for granting an interview for this article.

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4 Responses to “The Pentecostal Experience of William Booth-Clibborn”

  1. Tom Chinen Says:

    I have been looking for a long time for the lyrics to this lovely song but nowhere is it in the modern day singers albums. I want to sing this anthem for my church’s Christmas service. I just hope I can do justice to such a wonderful tribute to Jesus. Tom

  2. Kevin Roberts Says:

    I am the grandson of Pastor Evert Roberts, the founder of Meridian Gospel Tabernacle in Meridian, Idaho. We are preparing to celebrate our 70th anniversary this Sunday, November 14th 2010. In our preparation William Booth-Clibborn’s name has been discussed. I remember him visiting our church in the early 60’s when I was a small boy. My favorite memory was the time he stood in the pulpit and announced that because there were more children in the audience than adults he would speak to us instead of our parents. He reinacted the story of Moses. To this day I can see him on his knees praying as part of the reinactment. What a blessing.

  3. Paige Erickson Lampson Says:

    William was my great-grandfather. We called him grandfather B.C. I remember him at Christmas time at my grandmother Catherine’s house. His daughter Catherine was baptized with the Holy Spirit at a missionary meeting and told me that the missionarys there actually recognized some of the languages she spoke, chinese and others I believe. That is how she knew it was real.

    Grandfather B.C. would never let us take a picture of him without a Bible in his hand. Remember in the 60’s you had to use those one use bulbs. I remember him rushing around to find a Bible to hold before the family photo.

  4. Mrs Malcomson Says:

    Thank you for writing on this man of God. Just two things to check: As far as his parents were concerned, they named him William Emmanuel (not Edmond) and I believe he was born in Switzerland (not France) where the Booth-Clibborn’s worked & had such great effect – Katie having been imprisoned there for Salvationist gatherings. I have The Demarest Campaign Hymn book (his sister Victoria) in which one can find many, many great hymns by W.E. B-C. When he preached at Glad Tidings Tabernacle,New York, they said fire came down on the more than 1,500 present. Thank you for writing about one of God’s great servants.

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